Thursday, January 15, 2009

Indian Exam Papers

Download samples from here. Year XII is apparently GCSE age.

9 comments:

Chalcedon said...

I had a go at the Chemistry paper, series 1 XII. It was challenging. Much more so than the GCSE ones I have seen for the past two years. To my mind it was a real chemistry exam, not like some of the rather simplistic questions in our GCSE nor were there any multiple choice questions. You had to know your stuff backwards for the Indian paper. That said, our GCSE has questions for a range of abilities which accounts for the mix of easy and more difficult questions.

There was a chem paper set with questions from the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s and present decade. Taken by A grade GCSE pass candidated. The overall rate was 26% (fail) and the score on the questions from 20 years ago and older was 16% (fail). One lad in Birmingham got 94%. I got 93% but there again I got an A at A level chemistry in 1971 etc etc.

Anonymous said...

The exams are different (since they combine GCE and CSE) but the teaching is the same (perhaps sadly, since the world does move on). Even if it were not the case then I can assure you that universities and employers would be complaining night and day about declining education standards. As they are not (and the UK was recently winning plaudits for science education) can we move on? Modern parents with kids going through school right now know both how state schools were in the 70s and how they are now and you aren't going to convince any of them that they have got worse. Which is good, because to be honest Labour have done nothing with them and all the real progress was made under John Major. That said, secondary education really means bugger all. If it did, India would presumably be the cats whiskers by now, wouldn't it? They would at least have learned not to breed like rabbits.

Dave H said...

I looked at the Chemistry too, it's the one I stand the best chance with!

I did think it was far more challenging than sample GCSEs, you had to actuually know facts, say:

"Choose amphoteric oxide from the following
(a) MgO (b) Al2O3 (c) NO2 (d) ZnO"

It certainly ain't c. I'd opt for b)

Most challenging of all though was the English:

"Which salt is following types of medicine is used for treating indigestion?"
You can only work out what he meant to say from the choices.

(a) Antibiotic (b) Analgesics (c) Antacid (d) Antiseptic

JuliaM said...

"Even if it were not the case then I can assure you that universities and employers would be complaining night and day about declining education standards."

There have been plenty of complaints from both areas.

"Modern parents with kids going through school right now know both how state schools were in the 70s and how they are now and you aren't going to convince any of them that they have got worse."

Read any online discussion of educational standards of your choice; you'll find plenty of parents who are only too well aware of the decline in standards.

Or, if you know any couples with kids, try quizzing then on some basic geography/science/maths. You might get a bit of a surprise.

Hugh Oxford said...

The Spectator recently related some research which demonstrated that a "fail" in A level maths in 1988 would get a "B" today.

To my mind, there's a simple way of demonstrating whether standards have declined or not. Give today's pupils the papers of twenty years ago, mark them by the same criteria and see how they fare.

archduke said...

computer science sample paper
class xii

some examples of the questions asked:


name the header files that shall be needed for successful compilation of the following C++ code


in the following C++ program,what will be the maximum and minimum value of r generated with the help of random function


Name the member functions which are accessible by the objects of class Payment

Write a function in C++ which accepts a character array and its size as arguents and reverse that array without using a second array and library function.

Write the equivalent Boolean expression for the following Circuit (diagram)

For the given truth table, give canonical sum-of-products (SOP) and canonical product-of-sum (POS) expression

Homophobic Horse said...

""Choose amphoteric oxide from the following
(a) MgO (b) Al2O3 (c) NO2 (d) ZnO"

It certainly ain't c. I'd opt for b)"

Oh darling, it is C. Nitrogen Oxide is a brown gas (at room temperature). On a cold clear day it gets suspended in the sky as brown mist. It's also what smog is made out of.

B is the fine grey film that covers aluminium. For instance on a bike wheel.

Himanshu Sethi said...

Download Sample Question Paper Here.

Himanshu Sethi said...

Download Sample Question Paper Here.